MAKING SENSE of international developments is a new opportunity for Op-Ed comments by our staff, research associates and partners. PhD researcher Ilia Barboutev opens the series with an analysis of various conflicts which loom around Europe at the beginning of 2018 in issues 1 and 2.

 

 

  • MAKING SENSE of International Developments, 4.

    Leiden UniversityKenan Cruz Çilli

    The beginning of the political year in Turkey has been marked by what is likely to be the overarching theme for the months to come: the presidential race and the upcoming elections. In 2019, the Turkish electorate will head to the polls three times for ordinary municipal elections, as well as for parliamentary and presidential ones.

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  • MAKING SENSE of International Developments, 3.

    Johns Hopkins UniversityJoshua Henderson

    The United States and China are leading the world in investing in new technologies, specifically advanced computing such as artificial intelligence and AVs. These two countries are global economic leaders and rivals. AV technology is not only a commercial opportunity for the countries but also a strategic imperative.

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  • MAKING SENSE of International Developments, 2.

    PhD candidate Leiden UniversityIlia Barboutev

    Turkey shares a border with the EU where troubling developments are occurring. With a population of over 80 million people, and through its role as a host of over 3 million Syrian refugees who would otherwise have tried to come to Europe, the current instability plaguing the country should be a serious concern for all Europeans.

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  • MAKING SENSE of International Developments, 1.

    PhD candidate Leiden UniversityIlia Barboutev

    We are nearing the 30th anniversary of Francis Fukuyama’s famous prediction that Western liberal democracy will come to be the universally accepted and final form of government. In the summer of 1989, Mr. Fukuyama, while witnessing the collapse of the Soviet Empire, prophesized a future world largely devoid of ideological struggles, where consumerism, a general sense of boredom and intellectual stagnation would rule the day.

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Editorial Policy
The contents of issues of MAKING SENSE are the sole responsibility of the author. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the Sen Foundation. The director will select submitted contributions mainly on their added value for current debates, quality of reasoning and clarity of expression. Ilia Barboutev opens the series and will assist in collecting and editing other contributions. Advanced researchers and students are invited to present conclusions of their research which are relevant for public policy or contribute reflections on important policy questions. Submissions should not exceed 600 words. MAKING SENSE will be issued at least once a month and more frequently if the occasion arises.